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How Much Water to Drink A Day?

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About This Tool

The online human water requirement calculator is used to estimate how much water you should drink every day.

Human Water Consumption Requirements

Water is the largest single constituent of the human body and is essential for cellular homeostasis and a healthy lifestyle. Daily water intake must be balanced with losses in order to maintain total body water. Body water deficits challenge the ability to maintain homeostasis during perturbations (e.g., sickness, physical exercise, and environmental exposure) and can affect function and health. It is very important to drink enough water during a day.

Adequate Intake for Total Water Table

An adequate intake for total water (from a combination of drinking water, beverages, and food) is set to prevent deleterious, primarily acute, effects of dehydration, which include metabolic and functional abnormalities. The adequate intake for total water is set based on the median total water intake from U.S. survey data[1].

Age, Gender & Additional InformationAdequate Intake for Total Water
0–6 months infants0.7 L/day of water, assumed to be from human milk.
7–12 months infants0.8 L/day of total water, assumed to be from human milk, complementary foods and beverages. This includes approximately 0.6 L (≈ 3 cups) as total fluid, including formula or human milk, juices, and drinking water.
1–3 years children1.3 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 0.9 L (≈ 4 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
4–8 years children1.7 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 1.2 L (≈ 5 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
9–13 years boys2.4 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 1.8 L (≈ 8 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
14–18 years boys3.3 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 2.6 L (≈ 11 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
9–13 years girls2.1 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 1.6 L (≈ 7 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
14–18 years girls2.3 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 1.8 L (≈ 8 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
>18 years men3.7 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 3.0 L (≈ 13 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
>18 years women2.7 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 2.2 L (≈ 9 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
Pregnant women3.0 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 2.3 L (≈ 10 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
Lactating women3.8 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 3.1 L (≈ 13 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.

Drinking Water and Weight Loss

Scientists find that drinking water may help you to lose weight. A new study, presented at the 2010 National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston, has found that obese dieters who drank two cups of water before each meal lost 5 pounds more than a group of dieters who didn't increase their water intake after three months.

Don't Drink Too Much Water Too Fast

Drinking too much water too fast can be dangerous to your health. Acute water toxicity has been reported due to rapid consumption of large quantities of fluids that greatly exceeded the kidney’s maximal excretion rate of from 0.7 to 1.0 L/hour (≈ 3-4 cups/hour).

References

[1] Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate (2004)

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