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Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time, which every day produces, and which most men throw away, but which nevertheless will make at the end of it no small deduction from the life of man.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
The only things in which we can be said to have any property are our actions. Our thoughts may be bad, yet produce no poison; they may be good, yet produce no fruit. Our riches may be taken away by misfortune, our reputation by malice, our spirits by calamity, our health by disease, our friends by death. But our actions must follow us beyond the grave; with respect to them alone, we cannot say that we shall carry nothing with us when we die, neither that we shall go naked out of the world.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
To look back to antiquity is one thing, to go back to it is another.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Tyrants have not yet discovered any chains that can fetter the mind.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Where we cannot invent, we may at least improve; we may give somewhat of novelty to that which was old, condensation to that which was diffuse, perspicuity to that which was obscure, and currency to that which was recondite.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
He that will believe only what he can fully comprehend, must have a very long head or a very short creed.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Times of general calamity and confusion have ever been productive of the greatest minds. The purest ore is produced from the hottest furnace, and the brightest thunderbolt is elicited from the darkest storm.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
None are so fond of secrets as those who do not mean to keep them.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Two things, well considered, would prevent many quarrels: first, to have it well ascertained whether we are not disputing about terms rather than things and, second, to examine whether that on which we differ is worth contending about.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Liberty will not descend to a people; a people must raise themselves to liberty; it is a blessing that must be earned before it can be enjoyed.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
If you would be known, and not know, vegetate in a village; if you would know, and not be known, live in a city.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Men are born with two eyes, but only one tongue, in order that they should see twice as much as they say.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Silence is foolish if we are wise, but wise if we are foolish.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
True friendship is like sound health, the value of it is seldom known until it be lost.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Tomorrow! It is a period nowhere to be found in all the registers of time, unless, perchance, in the fool's calendar.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
War kills men, and men deplore the loss; but war also crushes bad principles and tyrants, and so saves societies.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
No one knows where he who invented the plow was born, nor where he died; yet he has done more for humanity than the whole race of heroes who have drenched the earth with blood and whose deeds have been handed down with a precision proportionate only to the mischief they wrought.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Early rising not only gives us more life in the same number of years, but adds, likewise, to their number; and not only enables us to enjoy more of existence in the same time, but increases also the measure.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
He that knows himself, knows others; and he that is ignorant of himself, could not write a very profound lecture on other men's heads.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
From its very inaction, idleness ultimately becomes the most active cause of evil; as a palsy is more to be dreaded than a fever. The Turks have a proverb which says that the devil tempts all other men, but that idle men tempt the devil.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
It is far more easy to acquire fortune like a knave than to expend it like a gentleman.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
No man is wise enough, nor good enough to be trusted with unlimited power.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Examinations are formidable even to the best prepared, for the greatest fool may ask more than the wisest man can answer.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
To know the pains of power, we must go to those who have it; to know its pleasures, we must go to those who are seeking it; the pains of power are real, its pleasures imaginary.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Nobility of birth does not always insure a corresponding unity of mind; if it did, it would always act as a stimulus to noble actions; but it sometimes acts as a clog rather than a spur.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
The intoxication of anger, like that of the grape, shows us to others, but hides us from ourselves. We injure our own cause in the opinion of the world when we too passionately defend it.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Men's arguments often prove nothing but their wishes.
—  Charles Caleb Colton
Power will intoxicate the best hearts, as wine the strongest heads. No man is wise enough, nor good enough to be trusted with unlimited power.
—  Charles Caleb Colton

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