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Why, then the world's mine oyster, Which I with sword will open.
—  William Shakespeare
My heart is turned to stone; I strike it, and it hurts my hand.
—  William Shakespeare
OCTAVIUS: He's a tried and valiant soldier. ANTONY: So is my horse, Octavius; and for that I do appoint him store of provender.
—  William Shakespeare
How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?
—  William Shakespeare
Our revels now are ended. These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits, and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on; and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.
—  William Shakespeare
There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.
—  William Shakespeare
You told a lie, an odious damned lie; Upon my soul, a lie, a wicked lie.
—  William Shakespeare
You have a nimble wit; I think 'twas made of Atlanta's heels.
—  William Shakespeare
That's a valiant flea that dares eat his breakfast on the lip of a lion.
—  William Shakespeare
It is not enough to help the feeble up, but to support him after.
—  William Shakespeare
Lives like a drunken sailor on a mast, Ready with every nod to tumble down Into the fatal bowels of the deep.
—  William Shakespeare
Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty; For in my youth I never did apply Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood.
—  William Shakespeare
I will live in thy heart, die in thy lap, and be buried in thy eyes; and moreover I will go with thee to thy uncle's.
—  William Shakespeare
For there was never yet philosopher That could endure the toothache patiently.
—  William Shakespeare
Glory is like a circle in the water, Which never ceaseth to enlarge itself, Till by broad spreading it disperse to nought.
—  William Shakespeare
We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villians by compulsion.
—  William Shakespeare
Have more than thou showest, Speak less than thou knowest, Lend less than thou owest.
—  William Shakespeare
Take heed, dear heart, of this large privilege; The hardest knife ill-used doth lose his edge.
—  William Shakespeare
All is well ended if this suit be won. That you express content; which we will pay, With strife to please you, day exceeding day.
—  William Shakespeare
April ... hath put a spirit of youth in everything.
—  William Shakespeare
But, O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes!
—  William Shakespeare
... and in the end, Having my freedom, boast of nothing else But that I was a journeyman to grief?
—  William Shakespeare
If thou art rich, thou'rt poor; For, like an ass whose back with ingots bows, Thou bear'st thy heavy riches but a journey, And death unloads thee.
—  William Shakespeare
Why, all delights are vain; but that most vain, Which, with pain purchas'd, doth inherit pain.
—  William Shakespeare
A scar nobly got, or a noble scar, is a good livery of honour; so belike is that.
—  William Shakespeare
O, it is excellent To have a giant's strength, but it is tyrannous To use it like a giant.
—  William Shakespeare
CLEOPATRA: If it be love indeed, tell me how much. ANTONY: There's beggary in the love that can be reckoned. CLEOPATRA: I'll set a bourne how far to be belov'd. ANTONY: Then must thou needs find out new heaven, new earth.
—  William Shakespeare
And oftentimes excusing of a fault Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse, As patches set upon a little breach, Discredit more in hiding of the fault Than did the fault before it was so patch'd.
—  William Shakespeare
Had I but serv'd my God with half the zeal I serv'd my king, he would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.
—  William Shakespeare
... your noble son is mad: Mad call I it; for, to define true madness, What is't but to be nothing else but mad? But let that go.
—  William Shakespeare
If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men's cottages princes palaces. It is a good divine that follows his own instructions: I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done, than be one of the twenty to follow mine own teaching.
—  William Shakespeare
Though I am not naturally honest, I am so sometimes by chance.
—  William Shakespeare
Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up Thine own life's means!
—  William Shakespeare
Think'st thou I'd make a life of jealousy, To follow still the changes of the moon With fresh suspicions? No; to be once in doubt Is once to be resolved.
—  William Shakespeare
O thou invisible spirit of wine! if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil!
—  William Shakespeare
All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. Teach thy necessity to reason thus; There is no virtue like necessity.
—  William Shakespeare
Vex not his ghost: O let him pass; he hates him That would upon the rack of this tough world Stretch him out longer.
—  William Shakespeare
Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge, That no king can corrupt.
—  William Shakespeare
Unbidden guests Are often welcomest when they are gone.
—  William Shakespeare
The robb'd that smiles steals something from the thief.
—  William Shakespeare
Down, down to hell; and say that I sent thee thither.
—  William Shakespeare
The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel.
—  William Shakespeare
Refrain tonight, and that shall lend a hand of easiness to the next abstinence; the next more easy; for use can almost change the stamp of nature, and either curb the devil, or throw him out with wondrous potency.
—  William Shakespeare
Hamlet: What news? Rosencrantz: None, my lord, but that the world's grown honest. Hamlet: Then is doomsday near.
—  William Shakespeare
Be not afraid of greatness: ... Some are born great, Some achieve greatness, And some have greatness thrust upon them.
—  William Shakespeare
He was a man, take him for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again.
—  William Shakespeare
They say the owl was a baker's daughter. Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be. God be at your table!
—  William Shakespeare
You may my glories and my state depose, But not my griefs; still am I king of those.
—  William Shakespeare
How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank! Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica: look, how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold; There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins. Such harmony is in immortal souls; But whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.
—  William Shakespeare
What, courage, man! What though care killed a cat, thou hast mettle enough in thee to kill care.
—  William Shakespeare
O gentlemen! the time of life is short; To spend that shortness basely were too long, If life did ride upon a dial's point, Still ending at the arrival of an hour.
—  William Shakespeare
But words are words; I never did hear That the bruised heart was pierced through the ear.
—  William Shakespeare
That England, that was wont to conquer others, Hath made a shameful conquest of itself.
—  William Shakespeare
I do not much dislike the matter, but The manner of his speech.
—  William Shakespeare
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause.
—  William Shakespeare
The fault, dear Brutus, lies not in our stars, But in ourselves if we are underlings.
—  William Shakespeare
Take but degree away, untune that string, And, hark! what discord follows; each thing meets In mere oppugnancy.
—  William Shakespeare
He was not born to shame: Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit.
—  William Shakespeare
Gold is worse poison to a man's soul, doing more murders in this loathsome world, than any mortal drug.
—  William Shakespeare
A little fire is quickly trodden out, Which, being suffered, rivers cannot quench.
—  William Shakespeare
Therefore my age is as a lusty winter, Frosty, but kindly: let me go with you.
—  William Shakespeare
I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death.
—  William Shakespeare
My conscience hath a thousand several tongues. And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain.
—  William Shakespeare
Get thee glass eyes, And, like a scurvy politician, seem To see the things thou dost not.
—  William Shakespeare
Through tattered clothes small vices do appear; Robes and furred gowns hide all. Plate sin with gold, And the strong lance of justice breaks; Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw does pierce it.
—  William Shakespeare
The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.
—  William Shakespeare
As true a lover As ever sighed upon a midnight pillow.
—  William Shakespeare
O God! I could be bounded in a nutshell, and count myself king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.
—  William Shakespeare
Do you not know I am a woman? when I think, I must speak.
—  William Shakespeare
Thyself shall see the act; For, as thou urgest justice, be assured Thou shalt have justice, more than thou desir'st.
—  William Shakespeare
The big round tears Cours'd one another down his innocent nose, In piteous chase.
—  William Shakespeare
Ay, sir; to be honest, as this world goes, is to be one man picked out of ten thousand.
—  William Shakespeare
When valor preys on reason, It eats the sword it fights with.
—  William Shakespeare
Thou hast not half that power to do me harm As I have to be hurt.
—  William Shakespeare
Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.
—  William Shakespeare
Sorrow breaks seasons and reposing hours, Makes the night morning, and the noontide night.
—  William Shakespeare
They say the best men are molded out of faults and, for the most, become much more the better for being a little bad.
—  William Shakespeare
There's no better sign of a brave mind than a hard hand.
—  William Shakespeare
The And thus I clothe my naked villany With odd old ends stol'n forth of holy writ, And seem a saint when most I play the devil.
—  William Shakespeare
To business that we love we rise betime, And go to't with delight.
—  William Shakespeare
Ah, what a sign it is of evil life, Where death's approach is seen so terrible!
—  William Shakespeare
I thought my heart had been wounded with the claws of a lion.
—  William Shakespeare
But jealous souls will not be answer'd so; They are not ever jealous for the cause, But jealous for they are jealous: 'tis a monster Begot upon itself, born on itself.
—  William Shakespeare
Beauty itself doth of itself persuade The eyes of man without an orator.
—  William Shakespeare
Sir, I am a true laborer: I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness, glad of other men's good, content with my harm, and the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze and my lambs suck.
—  William Shakespeare
Be still prepared for death: and death or life shall thereby be the sweeter.
—  William Shakespeare
Great eaters and great sleepers are incapable of anything else that is great.
—  William Shakespeare
Why, now I see there's mettle in thee, and even from this instant do build on thee a better opinion than ever before.
—  William Shakespeare
Good friend, for Jesu's sake forbear To dig the dust enclosed here. Blest be the man that spares these stones, And cursed be he that moves my bones.
—  William Shakespeare
Like a man made after supper of a cheese-paring: when a' was naked, he was, for all the world, like a forked radish, with a head fantastically carved upon it with a knife.
—  William Shakespeare
He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.
—  William Shakespeare
It is meant that noble minds keep ever with their likes; for who so firm that cannot be seduced.
—  William Shakespeare
He that loves to be flattered is worthy of the flatterer.
—  William Shakespeare
True hope is swift, and flies with swallow's wings; Kings it makes gods, and meaner creatures kings.
—  William Shakespeare
I hate ingratitude more in a man Than lying, vainness, babbling drunkenness, Or any taint of vice whose strong corruption Inhabits our frail blood.
—  William Shakespeare
By the apostle Paul, shadows tonight Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers.
—  William Shakespeare
A jest's prosperity lies in the ear Of him that hears it, never in the tongue Of him that makes it.
—  William Shakespeare
There are many events in the womb of time which will be delivered.
—  William Shakespeare
False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
—  William Shakespeare
Go to your bosom; Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know.
—  William Shakespeare
O sleep! O gentle sleep! Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh mine eyelids down And steep my senses in forgetfulness? Why, rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs, Upon uneasy pallets stretching thee, And hush'd with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber, Than in the perfum'd chambers of the great, Under canopies of costly state, And lull'd with sound of sweetest melody?
—  William Shakespeare
When we are born, we cry that we are come To this great stage of fools.
—  William Shakespeare
Conscience is but a word that cowards use, Devised at first to keep the strong in awe.
—  William Shakespeare
Cock-crow at Christmas Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long; And then, they say, no spirit can walk abroad; The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike, No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm, So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.
—  William Shakespeare
I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.
—  William Shakespeare
Some men never seem to grow old. Always active in thought, always ready to adopt new ideas, they are never chargeable with foggyism. Satisfied, yet ever dissatisfied, settled, yet ever unsettled, they always enjoy the best of what is, are the first to find the best of what will be.
—  William Shakespeare
For it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours.
—  William Shakespeare
I am the Prince of Wales; and think not, Percy, To share with me in glory any more: Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere; Nor can one England brook a double reign.
—  William Shakespeare
Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love.
—  William Shakespeare
There's not one wise man among twenty will praise himself.
—  William Shakespeare
Oh, Lord, who lends me life, lend me a heart replete with thankfulness.
—  William Shakespeare
Our bodies are our gardens, to which our wills are gardeners.
—  William Shakespeare
I praise God for you, sir: your reasons at dinner have been sharp and sententious; pleasant without scurrility, witty without affectation, audacious without impudency, learned without opinion, and strange with-out heresy.
—  William Shakespeare
Oft expectation fails, and most oft where most it promises; and oft it hits where hope is coldest; and despair most sits.
—  William Shakespeare
Well, I'll repent, and that suddenly, while I am in some liking; I shall be out of heart shortly, and then I shall have no strength to repent.
—  William Shakespeare
Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.
—  William Shakespeare
I have seen better faces in my time Than stands on any shoulder that I see Before me at this instant.
—  William Shakespeare
How often the sight of means to do ill deeds, makes deeds ill done.
—  William Shakespeare
Here comes Monsieur Le Beau. With his mouth full of news. Which he will put on us as pigeons feed their young.
—  William Shakespeare
To lapse in fulness Is sorer than to lie for need, and falsehood Is worse in kings than beggars.
—  William Shakespeare
Constant you are, But yet a woman; and for secrecy, No lady closer; for I well believe Thou wilt not utter what thou dost not know.
—  William Shakespeare
We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.
—  William Shakespeare
Set honour in one eye and death i' the other, And I will look on both indifferently.
—  William Shakespeare
I am a true laborer: I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness, glad of other men's good, content with my harm.
—  William Shakespeare
Unhand me, gentlemen, By heaven, I'll make a ghost of him that lets me.
—  William Shakespeare
Zounds! sir, you are one of those that will not serve God if the devil bid you.
—  William Shakespeare
I can suck melancholy out of a song, as a weasel sucks eggs.
—  William Shakespeare
But wherefore could not I pronounce 'Amen'? I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen' Stuck in my throat.
—  William Shakespeare
The last taste of sweets is sweetest last, Writ in remembrance more than things long past.
—  William Shakespeare
I count myself in nothing else so happy As in a soul remembering my good friends.
—  William Shakespeare
Well, God's above all; and there be souls must be saved, and there be souls must not be saved.
—  William Shakespeare
What's in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet;
—  William Shakespeare
Macbeth to Ghost of Banquo: Dare me to the desert with thy sword, If trembling I inhabit then, protest me The baby of a girl.
—  William Shakespeare
Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
—  William Shakespeare
Company, villanous company, hath been the spoil of me.
—  William Shakespeare
How much better is it to weep at joy than to joy at weeping?
—  William Shakespeare
God shall be my hope, My stay, my guide and lantern to my feet.
—  William Shakespeare
Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind; and therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
—  William Shakespeare
I would give all my fame for a pot of ale and safety.
—  William Shakespeare
O, woe is me, To have seen what I have seen, see what I see!
—  William Shakespeare
Keep thy foot out of brothels, thy hand out of plackets, thy pen from lender's books, and defy the foul fiend.
—  William Shakespeare
Some griefs are medicinal. Some griefs are med'cinable.
—  William Shakespeare
The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair if they were not cherished by our own virtues.
—  William Shakespeare
Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot, Take thou what course thou wilt!
—  William Shakespeare
A rarer spirit never Did steer humanity; but you gods will give us Some faults to make us men.
—  William Shakespeare
That affable familiar ghost Which nightly gulls him with intelligence.
—  William Shakespeare
Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,? Which we ascribe to heaven.
—  William Shakespeare
This above all: to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.
—  William Shakespeare
Lay aside life-harming heaviness, And entertain a cheerful disposition.
—  William Shakespeare
Time's glory is to calm contending kings, To unmask falsehood, and bring truth to light.
—  William Shakespeare
Britain is A world by itself, and we will nothing pay For wearing our own noses.
—  William Shakespeare
Every one fault seeming monstrous till his fellow fault came to match it.
—  William Shakespeare
A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm.
—  William Shakespeare
We, ignorant of ourselves; Beg often our own harms, which the wise powers Deny us for our good; so find we profit By losing of our prayers.
—  William Shakespeare
If thou and nature can so gently part, The stroke of death is as a lover's pinch, Which hurts, and is desir'd.
—  William Shakespeare
O God! that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains; that we should, with joy, pleasance, revel, and applause, transform ourselves into beasts.
—  William Shakespeare
I know a bank whereon the wild thyme blows Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows Quite canopied over with luscious woodbine With sweet muskroses and with eglantine. There sleeps Titania sometime of the night Lulled in these flowers with dances and delights.
—  William Shakespeare
LEAR: Dost thou call me a fool, boy? FOOL: All thy other titles thou hast given away; that thou wast born with.
—  William Shakespeare
Murder most foul, as in the best it it; But this most foul, strange, and unnatural.
—  William Shakespeare
Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but competency lives longer.
—  William Shakespeare
Orpheus with his lute made trees, And the mountain tops that freeze, Bow themselves, when he did sing; To his music, plants and flowers Ever sprung; as sun and showers There had made a lasting spring. Every thing that heard him play, Even the billows of the sea, Hung their heads, and then lay by. In sweet music is such art, Killing care and grief of heart Fall asleep, or hearing, die.
—  William Shakespeare
Mine honor is my life; both grow in one; Take honor from me and my life is done.
—  William Shakespeare
... the spring, the summer, The chilling autumn, angry winter, change Their wonted liveries; and the mazed world By their increase, now knows not which is which.
—  William Shakespeare
Sometimes we are devils to ourselves When we will tempt the frailty of our powers, Presuming on their changeful potency.
—  William Shakespeare
And this our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.
—  William Shakespeare

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