Online Tools and Calculators > Miscellaneous > Quote Search

Quote Search

Litigious terms, fat contentions, and flowing fees.
—  John Milton
He that studieth revenge keepeth his own wounds green, which otherwise would heal and do well.
—  John Milton
None But such as are good men can give good things, And that which is not good, is not delicious To a well-govern'd and wise appetite.
—  John Milton
A good book is the precious life-blood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.
—  John Milton
I fled, and cry'd out, Death; Hell trembled at the hideous name, and sigh'd From all her caves, and back resounded, Death.
—  John Milton
Enflamed with the study of learning and the admiration of virtue; stirred up with high hopes of living to be brave men and worthy patriots, dear to God, and famous to all ages.
—  John Milton
A poet soaring in the high reason of his fancies, with his garland and singing robes about him.
—  John Milton
From Man or Angel the great Architect Did wisely to conceal, and not divulge, His secrets, to be scanned by them who ought Rather admire. Or, if they list to try Conjecture, he his fabric of the Heavens Hath left to their disputes -- perhaps to move His laughter at their quaint opinions wide Hereafter, when they come to model Heaven And calculate the stars: how they will wield The mighty frame: how build, unbuild, contrive To save appearances; how gird the Sphere With Centric and Eccentric scribbled o'er, Cycle and Epicycle, Orb in Orb.
—  John Milton
Beholding the bright countenance of truth in the quiet and still air of delightful studies.
—  John Milton
I shall detain you no longer in the demonstration of what we should not do, but straight conduct ye to a hillside, where I will point ye out the right path of a virtuous and noble education; laborious indeed at the first ascent, but else so smooth, so green, so full of goodly prospect and melodious sounds on every side that the harp of Orpheus was not more charming.
—  John Milton
Hail wedded love, mysterious law, true source Of human offspring, sole propriety, In Paradise of all things common else.
—  John Milton
Attic tragedies of stateliest and most regal argument.
—  John Milton
Truth is as impossible to be soiled by any outward touch as the sunbeam.
—  John Milton
Chaos umpire sits And by decision more embroils the fray by which he reigns: next him high arbiter Chance governs all.
—  John Milton
Come to the sunset tree! The day is past and gone; The woodman's axe lies free, And the reaper's work is done.
—  John Milton
Ornate rhetorick taught out of the rule of Plato ... To which poetry would be made subsequent, or indeed rather precedent, as being less suttle and fine, but more simple, sensuous, and passionate.
—  John Milton
He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things ought himself to be a true poem.
—  John Milton
What thou art is mine; Our state cannot be sever'd, we are one, One flesh; to lose thee were to lose myself.
—  John Milton
With eyes Of conjugal attraction unreprov'd. Imparadised in one another's arms. With thee conversing I forget all time. And feel that I am happier than I know.
—  John Milton
Oft-times nothing profits more Than self-esteem, grounded on just and right Well manag'd.
—  John Milton
For this is not the liberty which we can hope, that no grievance ever should arise in the Commonwealth, that let no man in this world expect; but when complaints are freely heard, deeply considered, and speedily reformed, then is the utmost bound of civil liberty attained that wise men look for.
—  John Milton
Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience above all liberties.
—  John Milton
Men of most renowned virtue have sometimes by transgressing most truly kept the law.
—  John Milton
Then wilt thou not be loath To leave this Paradise, but shalt possess A Paradise within thee, happier far.
—  John Milton
This is the month, and this the happy morn, Wherein the Son of Heaven's eternal King, Of wedded maid, and virgin mother born, Our great redemption from above did bring; For so the holy sages once did sing, That He our deadly forfeit should release, And with His Father work us a perpetual peace.
—  John Milton
Not to know at large of things remote From us, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life Is the prime wisdom.
—  John Milton
Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep.
—  John Milton
Who shall silence all the airs and madrigals that whisper softness in chambers?
—  John Milton
Servant of God, well done, well hast thou fought The better fight, who singly has maintained Against revolted multitudes the cause Of truth, in word mightier than they in arms.
—  John Milton
Long is the way And hard, that out of hell leads up to light.
—  John Milton
In those vernal seasons of the year when the air is calm and pleasant, it were an injury and sullenness against nature not to go out and see her riches, and partake in her rejoicing with heaven and earth.
—  John Milton
Books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
—  John Milton
I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
—  John Milton
Such bickerings to recount, met often in these our writers, what more worth is it than to chronicle the wars of kites or crows flocking and fighting in the air?
—  John Milton
For neither man nor angel can discern Hypocrisy, the only evil that walks Invisible, except to God alone.
—  John Milton
Who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image, but thee who destroys a good book, kills reason its self.
—  John Milton
With ruin upon ruin, rout on rout, Confusion worse confounded.
—  John Milton
Seasoned life of man preserved and stored up in books.
—  John Milton
Where there is much desire to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing, many opinions; for opinion in good men is but knowledge in the making.
—  John Milton
As good almost kill a man as kill a good book: who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image; but he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were in the eye.
—  John Milton
Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation rousing herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks; methinks I see her as an eagle mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her undazzled eyes at the full midday beam.
—  John Milton
Son of Heav'n and Earth, Attend: that thou art happy, owe to God; That thou continuest such, owe to thyself, That is, to thy obedience; therein stand.
—  John Milton
By this time, like one who had set out on his way by night, and travelled through a region of smooth or idle dreams, our history now arrives on the confines, where daylight and truth meet us with a clear dawn, representing to our view, though at a far distance, true colours and shapes.
—  John Milton
Though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do ingloriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength. Let her and Falsehood grapple: who ever knew Truth put to the worse in a free and open encounter?
—  John Milton
License they mean when they cry Liberty; For who loves that, must first be wise and good.
—  John Milton
God is decreeing to begin some new and great period in His Church, even to the reforming of Reformation itself. What does He then but reveal Himself to His servants, and as His manner is, first to His Englishmen?
—  John Milton

About This Tool

This online quotation search tool is used to search thousands of quotes by author, word or phrase.

©2014 miniwebtool.com | Terms and Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us